Sunday, July 01, 2007

Bina Shah - "I Want to Foster a Future Booker Prize Winner"

The country's most promising young writer talks to Pakistan Paindabad.



[Interview conducted by Gaurav Sood]

Bina Shah, a Wellesley and Harvard alumna, is a noted Karachi based author, journalist, editor, and blogger. She has published two novels and two collections of short stories.

Her first collection of short stories, Animal Medicine, was published by Oxford University Press in 1999. The collection was followed by a well received novel, Where They Dream in Blue that catalogued the return of an expatriate to Karachi.

Ms. Shah currently edits the Alhamra Literary Review along with Illona Yusuf.

Biographical

Gaurav Sood: How was it growing up in Pakistan in the 1980s under Zia-ul-Haq?

Weird and tense. I remember the day Bhutto was hanged; I was only five but everyone was terrified that there would be some sort of reaction. And there wasn’t. The streets were quiet. Later, I remember “Black Days”, but I didn't understand what they were about. I touched on those days in my short story “1978” in Blessings, where this young boy grows up in the Zia era – the feeling of being out in some sort of wilderness physically echoes what it felt like in this country back then.

Gaurav Sood: You have spent a fair amount of time in US. You spent your "early years" in Virginia and then spent upwards of five years in Massachusetts getting educated first at Wellesley and then at the School of Education at Harvard. Can you tell us a little more about your time in the US?

Those were the years that formed me. From zero to five, you are absorbing everything and understanding how the world works. Getting your initial programming, so to speak.

When I returned for college and graduate school, it was a time of great freedom, of experimentation, trying my wings. The contrast between a sheltered upbringing in Pakistan and being in the hothouse environment of a Boston education couldn’t be greater. Both of those times in America made me who I am today.

Gaurav Sood: What was your experience like attending an all women liberal 'Liberal Arts' college in Massachusetts?

Absolutely fantastic! I would send my daughter there in an instant. You have your whole life to spend with men; you only get four years to spend it in an all-women environment. The amount of support, the building of self-confidence and self-esteem is unrivalled anywhere else. It was a very special time.

Gaurav Sood: Your book Where They Dream in Blue, published in 2001 deals with an ABCD's (American Born Confused Desi) visit to Karachi. How much of the book parallels your own journey? More generally, how hard was it for you to readjust to Karachi when you came back to Pakistan in the 1990s? Can you tell us about some of the specific challenges?

The book attempts to deal with the questions that any person visiting their homeland would feel, especially Pakistanis who were raised in America. The questions that a Pakistani raised in Britain would have might be slightly different, but I think there’s a universality that applies to everyone. Certainly, I grappled with many of those questions myself. Adjusting back to Karachi in 1995 was nowhere near as difficult as adjusting to it in 1977, when the differences between the two countries in terms of culture and environment were far different. In 1977, there was nobody like me – a person who’d been raised in America. In 1995, there were starting to be lots of kids like me, who had gone for school there and came back. However, the challenge was the same here as it would have been for any young adult attempting to re-enter the real world after college: what am I going to do with my life?

Gaurav Sood: You began your career as a Features Editor for Computerworld in 1996. That is fairly early time in terms of the web revolution, and even the Computer revolution when it comes to Pakistan. Can you tell us a little more about the 'technology scene' in Pakistan at that time? How has the new technology scene evolved in Pakistan over the past 11 years?

The technology scene in Pakistan was it its embryonic stages. The Internet had just come to Pakistan that year; and those of us who had been in America and used email got really excited about the Web and what it meant. People who were based here, especially traditional sorts of businesses, were suspicious and terrified of the new technology. So you had pockets of great understanding – we were like this little team, spread out across the country but keeping in touch through email and being astronauts in a way: “the Internet, the brave new world” – and then the larger landscape of resistance. But like they say in the space movies “resistance is futile”.

Now everyone’s using technology in much the same way they were using it in the United States around, say, 1999. Mobile phones are part of that boom, by the way. We could be doing more – applying technology more to our everyday lives, rather than making an effort to integrate Blackberries and Wifi, it should all fall into place naturally – but it is always going to be that much more of an effort here.

Authorship

Gaurav Sood: The heroes of both of your novels, Where They Dream in Blue, and The 786 Cybercafe, were men. Arati Belle, in her review of Animal Medicine, writes, "Curiously, she seems to get into the skin of the boy in this story than any of the girls in the other stories" in reference to the story 'Going Fishing'. Was it a deliberate choice on your part to use male protagonists? Can you expand on the reasons behind it?

Yes, it was a deliberate choice. When you are starting out with your writing, the last thing you want is for everyone to ask you, “Well, is this about you?” Making the protagonist a man was the easiest way I could think of to sidestep this question, which gets very annoying to answer after the twentieth time.

The other reason for using men as protagonists is that there’s a practical consideration: in this society, men simply have more access to certain situations and locations than women do. I don’t like it, but it is true. How many women of a middle class background do you know who would be able to set up a cybercaf√© on Tariq Road? So I bring women into the narrative, but then I try to highlight their positions/situations in society.

This is going to change in my next novel, in which the protagonist is a young girl. But she comes from a level of society in which she can slip in and out of various places because she is the poorest of the poor, and they have more liberty in many ways – at least at that age – than a middle or upper class woman in Pakistan. If that sounds like a paradox, it is.

Gaurav Sood: "In the novel there is room for poetry, for tenderness and violence, for description and investigation, for analysis and synthesis; there is room for portrayal of the countryside and of characters and of non-characters. That is, man from within and from without." Camilo Jose Cela, Nobel Prize winning Spanish author once said in an interview when asked about the novel. Do you agree with what he says? What do you think is the range of the novel as a medium? What are its limitations?

I had to look up the novel in my Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms to answer this question. The great strength of the novel is its freedom from limitations: style, structure, length, content. It is like this form that can absorb and make its own all the other literary forms around. If there are limitations to the novel, they exist in the limitations of the writer. A bad writer is going to write a bad novel, sure, but even a very good writer can be limited by her own limitations of experience, geography, knowledge of other disciplines, lack of world view, and so on. The novel really challenges you to dig deep within yourself as a writer and bring out everything you know. It will totally exhaust you as a medium if you are not up to the challenge.

Gaurav Sood: There are a variety of novels – the intellectual novel in the vein of Joyce and Sir Rushdie, an elemental novel or the simple novel, the kind of novel written, for example, in the style of Dickens, or Balzac. And then there are of course myriad hybrids. You, to me, have crafted two elemental novels. Firstly, do you agree with the statement and if so then can you tell us a little more behind what went behind the choice?

Yes, I agree with your statement. My first two novels were very simply written. I think I simply was not ready to write a very intellectual novel. I was young, I was inexperienced, and I was not confident. I had a story and I wanted to tell it. I did not feel entitled to comment upon the state of the world at large because I had seen so little of it, in my opinion. I wanted to concentrate on my stories and my characters, and do a good job of that; I felt I owed that to the reader first and foremost. My own theories could wait till I had figured out what they were. Why inflict that on my reader?

Gaurav Sood: Most authors are trying to write their psychological autobiographies and failing to write them honestly. Their inability to come to terms with their own ghosts, their psychological traumas, and their inability to forgive themselves and others, often creates perversions that surface in the form of misplaced viciousness with which they deal with some characters. They are also trying to 'understand' the world and often 'fail' to understand it. Let me provide an example to illustrate the point. You listed "Oh Human Bondage" as one of your favorite books in one of your interviews. The book is also a great favorite of mine. My friend Chaste recently provided a wonderful analysis of the thing I talked about and I paraphrase his analysis here- Philip Carey's character is largely autobiographical with his club foot a substitute for Maugham's stutter and closet homosexual status. Then there is Mildred, a common shop girl, who declines in status every time we meet her anew – from a struggling shop girl to a prostitute with syphilis. Chaste argues that Maugham uses Mildred's debasement as a way to come to terms with the trauma that he had to suffer from at the hands of his peers. He transfers all of that angst onto a working class girl than the middle-class women, at whose hands he most probably suffered. Can you comment briefly on the unduly broad statement with which I start with by first pruning it and then analyzing it?

For me, writing is a therapeutic process, not to try and heal the writer of any psychological demons, but to understand the world around them in some way. By writing about issues, especially ones that bother me, that nag me, that are complex and not easily categorized or understood, I grapple with them and eventually arrive at a better understanding of them. As for being vicious towards a character, that is an odd thing to do. As a writer I have love for all my characters, even the ones that aren’t particularly likeable, because they are my creations. I try to make them play out the complexities of life that I see going on in the real world, not the ones in my head.

Gaurav Sood: Can you now answer the question that I raise above with regards to your novel, The 786 Cyber caf√©, that in the words of one of your prior interviewers is "centered on a story based on the infamous ‘other side of the Clifton bridge’." In response to which you said, "I think people on this side of the bridge are more narrow-minded in many ways."

People are hemmed in everywhere by their preconceptions and prejudices. Just because you are rich and you are educated doesn’t mean you lack those preconceptions and prejudices. Nor does being rich or educated make you any more open-minded or tolerant. I believe the rich, the elite, those that live on “this side of the Clifton Bridge” – which is a bridge that connects the richest parts of Karachi, Clifton and Defence, to the rest of the town on the Saddar side and beyond – think that their intellectual work is done once they have gotten their college degrees and taken the reins of their fabulous destinies as the nation’s leaders. Intellectually they are some of the laziest people I have ever seen: content to expound forever on whatever theories they formulated thirty years ago, without taking in anything else and considering whether their views are outdated or inapplicable today. When you are hungry, in all sense of the word, you stay humble. And humility goes hand in hand with open-mindedness: the ability to realize that your view is only one of many, and only an opinion at best.

Gaurav Sood: Both of your novels and your current collection of stories have been published by Alhamra publishing. And you edit Alhamra Literary Review along with Ms. Yusuf. Al Al-Hamra in Arabic simply means "the red". It is of course usually used to describe the 13th Century "crimson castle" or Alhambra in Granada. Do you see the name 'Al Hamra' apt title for a Literary Review or for that matter a publishing house based in Karachi? And if so, why?

You would have to ask the publisher, Shafiq Naz, what was in his mind when he chose that name. I think he wanted to capture the idea that the Islamic world and Europe once had a rich, intertwined history in Moorish Spain. Literature is part of that cultural tradition. Maybe it is an oblique association. Going back to a time when art and literature and poetry was very grand and respected by kings and emperors. It is a good vision for a publishing house.

Gaurav Sood: What is your vision for the Alhamra Literary Review?

We want to encourage Pakistanis to write; we showcase their talent and creativity. I would like to foster a future Booker Prize winner. That is my vision.

Karachi

Mayank Austen Soofi: Since you an author, it would be interesting to raise this query with you. I have twice traveled to Pakistan and extensively toured the cities of Lahore and Karachi. I came across many good bookshops but alas not a great one. Should I have searched more or is the bookshop scene really that modest?

The Liberty Books chain is doing great things for Karachi. They’ve brought the best of English publishing to the country, although at high prices. But I don’t really know how to get around that issue. I always find their bookstores a pleasure to be in; they’re relaxing, inviting places. The staff is knowledgeable and helpful, and they’re working on promoting Pakistani writers with their new Book Club, which has hosted some fairly well-received launches of books, including my own. But a country like Pakistan really needs to have several excellent sources in each city for sourcing and obtaining books, and not just in the English language. Right now you have to really hunt for good literature. One day there will be a better bookshop culture, I’m sure.

Mayank Austen Soofi: Every great city leaves some imprint in the work of its writers. How has Karachi contributed to your writing?

I would think that’s fairly obvious from my work!

Mayank Austen Soofi: Being a young Pakistani writer who writes about young people, how would you chronicle the changing values of the urban youths in the country? Is it difficult to strike a balance between the Islamic heritage and the McDonald culture?

It is not a case of either/or. It is a case of 'and'. Understand that and you have understood the young people of Pakistan. They want choices. They do not want restrictions. But they want to choose both options, not to have to choose between them. This is the strength of Pakistani people of all ages: they are open to everything, influences from the East, the West, from Islam, from America, from Britain, from India. We are like big sponges and we are hungry for all of it. We absorb it all and then we distill it into something that is unique to us. I think that is magical and it should not be contained in any way.

Gaurav Sood: Just following up on the title of your novel, Where They Dream in Blue - what color would you pick to describe Karachi today? What color would be the dreams of Karachites?

Again, that should be fairly obvious! These days, however, I think the color of Karachi is brown. There’s a lot of dust and mud and construction going on here.

Gaurav Sood: Karachi has a multiplicity of cross-cutting ethnic and class cleavages – Sunnis Vs. Shias, Muhajirs Vs. Natives Vs. Afghans, Urdu speakers Vs. Punjabi Vs. Sindhi Vs. Pashto, rich vs. poor etc. Add to all of this a military, whose role according to Ayesha Siddiqui's new book runs deep within the economy. What is the prognosis for its future?

Oh God, you’re really asking me the easy questions, aren’t you? Karachi will survive everything. We already have. We will go on. Underneath everything, the people of Karachi want two things: to make lots of money and to be happy. To achieve both, you’ve got to get along with everyone else. We know how to do that, despite all evidence to the contrary.

Picking Favorites

Mayank Austen Soofi: Which is the last great book by a Pakistani author that you enjoyed?

The two books I really enjoyed most recently are anthologies: And the World Changed which was edited by Muneeza Shamsie and Beloved City which was edited by Bapsi Sidhwa. I’m sorry I can’t give you a book by a single author. These ones were fantastic just for the sheer variety of good writing between two sets of covers.

Mayank Austen Soofi: You maintain a personal blog. What are some of the other blogs that you like visiting?

From the ridiculous to the sublime: a variety of friends’ blogs, including Jonathan Ali’s Notes from a Small Island, Greg Rucker’s Glossophagia, Jawahara Saidullah’s Writing Life, and the Second Floor’s blog (that’s the coffeehouse that I frequent). Then there are some gossip blogs I have to go to every day, but I won’t name them here because it’s too lowbrow and I am supposed to be this great Pakistani writer. I enjoy the PostSecret site. I like Anglophenia from BBC America. I used to go to Miss Snark, the Literary Agent every day too, but she closed that one down.

Gaurav Sood: Where do you get your news?

I heard it on the grapevine, where else? Just kidding!

4 comments:

Naseem said...

This is one of the best interviews I have read in recent times. I’m a Pakistani American in LA and it is such a relief to know that we have people like Bina Shah. All the time I have to defend my country during debates with my American friends. I have to tell them that we are not only about Taliban and dictatorship. Now I can simply forward this link to them. Thank you Gauarv Sood for this great interview. I hope Bina Shah dream come true. One day Pakistan would get its Booker Prize winner. Thanks so much.

Manika said...

It is quite rare to come across an interview where the questions are as insightful as the answers. Though I haven’t read Bina’s books, I still found the interviewers’ questions were easy to follow and the answers led to an interest in the author’s works and her views in general. For example, it is interesting to read her reminiscing about her days in a ‘women’s college’. People often wonder how that works. Having studied in a women’s college myself, one has to agree with Bina when she says, “It was a special time.”
The question related to ‘Of Human Bondage’ made for interesting reading for a fan of the book. As did the fact about her works having male protagonists and her reasons for the same.
Bina’s reflections on Karachi and its people, especially the youth could be lifted for a lot of cities in India, the important thing being that it is about staying rooted to traditions while embracing the future.
And when Bina says, “your opinion is only one of many, and only an opinion at best”, you wish most people in the world would understand that.

Hira Syed said...

Wow! I consider my self absolutely lucky to have miss Bina Shah as my english teacher.
My future in english is promised!

Imran said...

I am very lucky to have Bina Shah as my teacher.